• Ada@lemmy.blahaj.zoneM
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    I’ll quote Tim Minchin here

    "If you wanna watch telly, you should watch Scooby Doo
    That show was so cool
    Because every time there was a church with a ghoul
    Or a ghost in a school
    They looked beneath the mask and what was inside?
    The fucking janitor or the dude who ran the waterslide
    Because throughout history
    Every mystery
    Ever solved has turned out to be
    Not magic"
    
    • lars@lemmy.sdf.org
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      Like one of my faves of his

      Do you know what they call alternative medicine that’s been proved to work? Medicine.

  • maliciousonion@lemmy.ml
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    Germ Theory

    Diseases used to be associated with paranormal powers or the wrath of gods in most cultures. The discovery of microorganisms and advancement of medicine may be our civilization’s greatest achievement.

  • Todd Bonzalez@lemm.ee
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    Religion exists for a number of reasons, but the primary purpose it serves an individual is as a foundation for their overall worldview.

    “Faith” as many call it, serves to answer questions we don’t have answers to.

    Where did we come from? Why are we here? What happens after we die?

    Religion gives us comforting answers to these questions, and as these questions are ultimately unanswerable, can do so in perpetuity.

    Religion has also tried to answer questions that we didn’t yet have answers for.

    What are the sun, moon, and stars? Why are there tides? Why does it rain?

    God was long accepted as the source of these things, and prayer was thought to be the best way have any influence.

    But today we have answered basically all the major questions. We have a working model of the entire solar system, down to the weather on other planets. We figured out how to turn rocks into computers. All that’s left is the unanswerable.

    As for where we come from, we’ve filled in a lot of gaps. Evolution is now the accepted answer for where Humans came from, now the question is where life itself came from, and if there’s life outside of Earth (and how much).

    Philosophy has given us plenty of options for what our purpose is. There are plenty of ways to wrap your mind around your own identity without turning to the supernatural.

    And our study of anatomy and neurology suggests that our conscious self ceases to exist after death, the only thing standing in the way of that belief is the very human tendency to be in denial of our own mortality.

  • ananas@sopuli.xyz
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    Science deals with the natural, gods are by definition supernatural.

    Science can not either prove or disprove existence of supernatural. It may only erode the reasoning why supernatural should exist.

    That reasoning is subjective, and as such, there are no definite answers to your question unless we add additional constraints.

    • frightful_hobgoblin@lemmy.ml
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      Didn’t some quantum nondeterminism prove the existence of effects without a natural cause? (being divil’s advocate a bit here for the craic)

      • ananas@sopuli.xyz
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        No

        Slapping “quantum” in front of something does not make it magic.

        • frightful_hobgoblin@lemmy.ml
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          Take ‘natural’ to mean ‘being fully explicable by states in the observable world’.

          ‘Supernatural’ means everything not natural by that definition.

          You have results (like Aspect’s experiment) that prove that the world is not naturalist: the world is not fully explainable by observable states causing other states.

          • ananas@sopuli.xyz
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            That is not the definition that natural sciences use for natural. Going down that rabbit hole is completely meaningless, since we are no longer talking about science at that point.

            In addition, if using your definition, nothing is natural according to our current understanding.

            • frightful_hobgoblin@lemmy.ml
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              That is not the definition that natural sciences use for natural.

              Go on then: what definition do they use?

              Slapping “quantum” in front of something does not make it magic.

              Slapping “quantum” in front of something generally makes it involve indeterminism (excepting the many-worlds interpretation)

              • ananas@sopuli.xyz
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                Go on then: what definition do they use?

                Natural means pretty much “element of the physical universe, identified by observation”.

                You’re claiming in another comment to this thread that you have M.Sc., you should be aware of this, please stop wasting everyone’s time.

                Slapping “quantum” in front of something generally makes it involve indeterminism (excepting the many-worlds interpretation)

                Indeterminism is by no means non-natural, and it does not make things any less observable. We can observe quantum states just fine.

                And as for

                Yeah all the Bell stuff

                “All the Bell stuff” doesn’t have anything to do with “Didn’t some quantum nondeterminism prove the existence of effects without a natural cause?”

                And no, it didn’t. AFAIK there are exactly zero physicists who argue that.

                You made a ludicrous claim, and are unable or unwilling to back it up even a bit, yet somehow you feel continuing this without anything to show is a good use of anyone’s time. If you are not going to make an actual argument, I do not see value in continuing this conversation, as all it does is make this thread more difficult to read for others who most likely are not very interested watching yet another internet argument sidethread.

                • frightful_hobgoblin@lemmy.ml
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                  Natural means pretty much “element of the physical universe, identified by observation”.

                  Right. We are in agreement. And indeterminism says that those natural things are not sufficient explanations of experimental results. There is something going on in Aspect’s experiment

                  Determinism: things are fully explained by natural phenomena, i.e. by observable elements of the physical universe

                  Indeterminism: observable elements of the physical universe are insufficient to explain experimental results; there is something else, like randomness

                  AFAIK there are exactly zero physicists who argue that.

                  We must be misunderstanding each other somewhere. Surely you’re not saying that zero physicists argue indeterminism? Obviously many/most physicists believe in indeterminism.

                  • A Snapshot of Foundational Attitudes Toward Quantum Mechanics (2013) by Schlosshauer, Kofler, and Zeilinger found that 64% of physicists believe that “Randomness is a fundamental concept in nature” and 48% believe “The randomness is irreducible”. For the question “What is your favorite interpretation of quantum mechanics?”, the most popular answer by some way was the Copenhagn interpretation (which as you know is anti-deterministic)

                  Lev Vaidman: “Historically, appearance of the quantum theory led to a prevailing view that Nature is indeterministic… Quantum theory and determinism usually do not go together.” (Vaidman, L. (2014). Quantum theory and determinism. Quantum Studies: Mathematics and Foundations, 1(1-2), 5–38. doi:10.1007/s40509-014-0008-4)

                  You made a ludicrous claim

                  Yes. And these ludicrous claims are standard in physics for decades now. Specifically, the ludicrous claim that most physicists believe is that there are things going on without natural causes (Natural means pretty much “element of the physical universe, identified by observation”). That’s an extremely standard ludicrous claim about our ludicrous universe.

                  and are unable or unwilling to back it up even a bit

                  That’s false.

                  yet somehow you feel continuing this without anything to show is a good use of anyone’s time. If you are not going to make an actual argument, I do not see value in continuing this conversation, as all it does is make this thread more difficult to read for others who most likely are not very interested watching yet another internet argument sidethread.

                  Please calm down.

            • frightful_hobgoblin@lemmy.ml
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              If I say something this person burst into flames for supernatural reasons, I mean without a measurable cause in the observable universe.

      • Quantum mechanics show a break between the classical understanding of physics and the equations and laws derived from plain observation and the probabilistic and unstable nature of matter and energy at the smallest observable level.

        Physics isn’t a done deal, we don’t know how a lot of stuff works. Our simplified classical models clearly don’t work on every level, but that doesn’t mean gravity suddenly doesn’t pull the earth and the moon towards each other.

        Large scale physics (somewhere between molecules and stars) is full of simplified models. From spherical cows to “assume you’re walking along a perfectly straight, frictionless surface in a vacuum”, very few of the formulae taught in school actually model what really happens. They’re approximations that work at every relevant scale of physics, as we lack the ability to accurately simulate the chaotic nature of individual particles and energy fields.

        Scientists were initially hoping that we could use Newton’s laws to describe how atoms interact (and then quarks and such, when they were discovered) and quantum theory has proven that this is not possible. That does not prove or disprove the existence of a higher being, it just proves that earlier extrapolations were wrong.

        There’s no common definition of “natural cause” within physics as a science, so there’s no way to prove or disprove anything regarding natural causes. You can define the term within a specific paper, but that just proves or disproves something within the confines of that specific paper, experiment, and definition. I can call a puddle of water “Jesus”, evaporate the puddle, and claim to have killed God, but outside of my own wacky experiment nothing religious has happened.

        Science will never be able to prove a negative, so no matter what happens, belief in the mere existence of the supernatural is always a possibility. Religion brings forth very few scientifically provable facts. We know lightning is caused by electrical discharge now, but we’ll never be able to prove that it’s not caused by an invisible Donar riding around in the heavens, swinging his hammer.

          • Skull giver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl
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            You can prove a negative in the mathematical sense, sure. You can’t prove a negative when the supernatural gets involved. Physics, chemistry, and biology aren’t Maths, and the supernatural isn’t formally defined mathematics.

              • Skull giver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl
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                I don’t think the second coming of Christ will have a tough job proving himself. Apocalyptic monsters and the dead rising would be a pretty clear way to prove the supernatural. So yes, it sure is possible.

                People have certainly tried to prove weaker supernatural events. That includes government researchers looking into telepathy. Double blind tests have so far failed to prove every scientific claim about supernatural powers and experiences brought forward so far.

                I haven’t seen any convincing evidence of the supernatural and the onus of proof is on the one that comes with the claim. Often, these claims are vague, imprecise, and noncommittal, so the proof is often weak and impossible to verify. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, as they say, and so far all the evidence I’ve been presented with had come down to “someone wrote this in a book millenia ago” and “I just feel it”.

      • teawrecks@sopuli.xyz
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        Whatever we observe empirically is “natural” by definition. Causality is an assumption, not a law of nature.

      • bunchberry@lemmy.world
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        The traditional notion of cause and effect is not something all philosophers even agree upon, I mean many materialist philosophers largely rejected the notion of simple cause-and-effect chains that go back to the “first cause” since the 1800s, and that idea is still pretty popular in some eastern countries.

        For example, in China they teach “dialectical materialist” philosophy part of required “common core” in universities for any degree, and that philosophical school sees cause and effect as in a sense dependent upon point of view, that an effect being described as a particular cause is just a way of looking at things, and the same relationship under a different point of view may in fact reverse what is considered the cause and the effect, viewing the effect as the cause and vice-versa. Other points of view may even ascribe entirely different things as the cause.

        It has a very holistic view of the material world so there really is no single cause to any effect, so what you choose to identify as the cause is more of a label placed by an individual based on causes that are relevant to them and not necessarily because those are truly the only causes. In a more holistic view of nature, Laplacian-style determinism doesn’t even make sense because it implies nature is reducible down to separable causes which can all be isolated from the rest and their properties can then be fully accounted for, allowing one to predict the future with certainty.

        However, in a more holistic view of nature, it makes no sense to speak of the universe being reducible to separable causes as, again, what we label as causes are human constructs and the universe is not actually separable. In fact, the physicists Dmitry Blokhintsev had written a paper in response to a paper Albert Einstein wrote criticizing Einstein’s distaste for quantum mechanics as based on his adherence to the notion of separability which stems from Newtonian and Kantian philosophy, something which dialectical materialists, which Blokhintsev self-identified as, had rejected on philosophical grounds.

        He wrote this paper many many years prior to the publication of Bell’s theorem which showed that giving up on separability (and by extension absolute determinism) really is a necessity in quantum mechanics. Blokhintsev would then go on to write a whole book called The Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics where in it he argues that separability in nature is an illusion and under a more holistic picture absolute determinism makes no sense, again, purely from materialistic grounds.

        The point I’m making is ultimately just that a lot of the properties people try to ascribe to “materialists” or “naturalists” which then later try to show quantum mechanics is in contradiction with, they seem to forget that these are large umbrella philosophies with many different sects and there have been materialist philosophers criticizing absolute determinism as even being a meaningful concept since at least the 1800s.

        • ananas@sopuli.xyz
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          If they were, it has nothing to do with nature being supernatural. It just means that nature’s state is not locally real. That does not tie into religion in any objective way.

          In addition, both of those articles are (slightly) wrong. There was a lenghty discussion about how in r/physics when they came out. The tl;dr is that it boils down to:

          • locality
          • realism
          • independence of measurement

          Pick two.

          But that has no relevance to religion other than you can make either philosophical or religious argument out of anything.

  • eightpix@lemmy.world
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    Heliocentric model.

    Cosmic distance and time. Light speed as a limit.

    The geological age of the Earth.

    Dinosaurs.

    Evolutionary theory.

    Continental drift.

    The periodic table of the elements.

    Quantum theory, including wave-particle duality.

    The Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

    Black holes.

    • GBU_28@lemm.ee
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      It’s interesting, some theists would just say “that’s how God built the universe” and be satisfied with that.

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        The halfway sensible ones would. But the ones that thing religious texts are magic books would burn the former as heretics if they were allowed to do so.

      • TheRealKuni@lemmy.world
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        Well sure. There are religious people who want to know how the world works. After all, if there is a creator/God then one of the ways that being communicated with us for certain is the universe we live in.

        • nyctre@lemmy.world
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          Never read the Quran, but had a coworker who claimed the quran explains a ton of science, including recent science. She also believed in creationism and therefore also thought evolution was bs, so I didn’t put much basis into her words.

    • Stovetop@lemmy.world
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      Which is a bit silly to me, in that any religious person could simply explain evolution away as the mechanism by which a god or gods created humanity (to iterate on form until creating their supposed “perfect image”).

      God being a human who was also his own father is fine, but the suggestion that evolution could be part of god’s plan is where we draw the line?

      • halowpeano@lemmy.world
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        They had to reject it because any religion with a creation myth specifically says how the god created people. To accept an alternative story would reject the notion of the book as truth.

        The religious are not looking for answers, they already have all the answers by definition of their holy book or whatever. They’re looking for confirmation bias and reject anything that goes against that.

        • StaySquared@lemmy.world
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          Nope. In Islam, God commands His servants to seek knowledge in all things. Muslims are obligated to seek knowledge because it will only continue to prove the existence of God.

        • howrar@lemmy.ca
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          If you’re talking specifically about the Abrahamic God, sure. But if it’s about the existence of any higher being, then there’s no contradiction here.

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              Anything that you would call a “god”.

              If I give an ostensive definition, I would say it includes the beings like the Abrahamic god, or Olympian gods, and exclude humans, animals, bacteria, the planet we live on, and objects we handle in our day to day lives. I’ll tentatively draw the line at any being that is not bound to the laws of physics as we understand them today.

              • PolandIsAStateOfMind@lemmy.ml
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                Why exclude humans, animals and bacteria? How about Sun? Jesus Christ? God-King Jayavarman II? A cat? Very small spirit of tiny stream? A holy stone (stone is not a human, nor animal or bacteria, a lot of stones were worshipped in various forms and meanings in history)? A tree chewed by pilgrims? Invisible Hand of the Market?

                Incredibly arbitrary definition again constructed to wriggle your way from any concrete statement.

                • theilleist@lemmy.ml
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                  If we had the technological power, would humans run simulations of universes with Planck length precision? Obviously yes. So extrapolating from our one and only example of intelligent life (us), it seems like intelligent life enjoys stimulating universes. If our reality were the result of that kind of project, and the engineers lived outside the laws of physics, I would call them higher beings. And they could be as hands-off or as interventionist as they pleased.

                • howrar@lemmy.ca
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                  I don’t think OP is asking about the existence of humans, or animals, or any other physical entity. If they were, you can trivially say that you exist, and therefore god exists. That’s unless you want to go into ontology and question what it means to “exist”, which I’m pretty sure also isn’t what OP intended.

      • emergencyfood@sh.itjust.works
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        any religious person could simply explain evolution away as the mechanism by which a god or gods created humanity

        Many did, and this position is called Deism. In most versions, god(s) started the universe with initial conditions that would lead to the formation of intelligent life, and then withdrew.

      • johsny@lemmy.world
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        Could be, but evolution makes God redundant, and then it is the whole simplest explanation thing that kicks in, right?

        • howrar@lemmy.ca
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          Occam’s razor doesn’t mean that the simplest explanation is always true, but rather that it’s usually the most likely to be true.

          Using simplicity as a measure of how likely something is to be true always felt a little anthropocentric. How do we determine that something is simple if not via the systems and abstractions that are easy for human minds to comprehend?

        • StaySquared@lemmy.world
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          No… not necessarily. Why can’t God command the creation of something and then allow the natural process to create said thing? Evolution doesn’t disprove the existence of God.

          • oo1@lemmings.world
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            The “god” part becomes an unnecessarily complex explanation. I prefer simpler explanations when they fit the data just as well as the complex ones. It also reduces te risk when trying to broaden out to other lines of enquiry.

            As johsny said It makes the god explanation redundant for the large topic of species of life. There’s no need to waste time or energy “disproving” god. The whole concept of god is simply useless to understanding - and so is a waste of time or mental energy.

            But the so called explanations referncing god are typically such bullshit anyway nothing testable, no evidence, just “god did some shit”, “isn’t god cool/powerful”. So they never were actually useful to scientific reasoning. However much they may pretend otherwise religions are so much more aligned with laws and social structures and norms of behaviour than they are about advancing science.

          • BitSound@lemmy.world
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            At some point you’re advocating for Deism. Which is fine enough, but doesn’t really provide any satisfactory answers. You need to define exactly what you mean by “God” before any further useful conversation can be had.

            The scientific process, including evolution, has dispelled the myths found in any religious textbook ever written, including their particular definitions of “God”. I’d suggest you just drop the word and the associated baggage, and start from scratch. Come up with a new word, and define properties for it that make a coherent argument.

            • StaySquared@lemmy.world
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              Well for one, I would recommend you drop the idea of what is God from the Christian perspective, they’re clueless. That much is true. Islam is far superior in terms of intellect and sophistication, after all the Quran is the literal Word of God. Unlike the Bible, authored by pagan and anti-Christ men who had a liking to Egyptian mythologies.

              (Quran 21:30) Have not those who disbelieve known that the heavens and the Earth were of one connected entity, then We separated them and We made every living thing out of water? Will they not then believe?

              (Quran 24:45) And Allah has created from water every living creature. Some of them crawl on their bellies, some walk on two legs, and some walk on four. Allah creates whatever He wills. Surely Allah is Most Capable of everything.

              (Quran 64:3) He designed you then made your design better.

              (Quran 40:64) He formed you then made your forms better.

              (Quran 71:17) And Allah has caused you to grow from the earth a [progressive] growth.

              (Quran 76:28) We created them and strengthened their forms.

              (Quran 82:6-9) O mankind, what has deceived you concerning your Lord, the Generous, Who created you, then proportioned you, and then balanced you; in whatever form He willed has He assembled you.

              Going to be blunt, if you read these verses (and there’s more verses) and don’t believe that this aligns with a creation of something, which in turn evolves (strengthens in its form) then it was meant to be. There’s nothing under the sun I could tell you that will pique your interest.

              God has Willed it. This is the way.

              • BitSound@lemmy.world
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                He designed you then made your design better. He formed you then made your forms better. We created them and strengthened their forms.

                That’s not how any of this works. None of these require the process of biological evolution, they’re clearly written as the islamic equivalent of intelligent design. Those describe some wizard creating something and then working to make it better, which is the opposite of how biological evolution works. Relying on “evolves” having several different meanings (evolves (strengthens in its form)) is not an argument that is made in good faith. The process of biological evolution is not described in any religious literature, including yours.

                And Allah has created from water every living creature

                I assume you bolded this because it’s important somehow. It’s not, though. It’s a vague allegory that has no predictive power, is not science, and has nothing to do with the process of biological evolution.

                • StaySquared@lemmy.world
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                  Religions don’t teach science. However, in Islam, we are obligated to learn science amongst other subjects. The verses you and I quoted do NOT conflict with evolution.

                  Many scientists believe that life on Earth originated in the ocean, and that all life was aquatic for the first 90% of Earth’s history. Some scientists think that life may have begun near deep sea hydrothermal vents, which are chimney-like vents that form when seawater mixes with magma on the ocean floor, creating superheated plumes. The chemicals and energy from these vents could have fueled chemical reactions that led to the evolution of life. For example, a 2017 study found tube-like fossils in rocks that are at least 3.77 billion years old that resemble microorganisms that live near hydrothermal vents today.

                  Furthermore, using the DNA sequences of modern organisms, biologists have tentatively traced the most recent common ancestor of all life to an aquatic microorganism that lived in extremely high temperatures — a likely candidate for a hydrothermal vent inhabitant!

                  But like I said before, there’s nothing under the sun that I can tell you that will sway you.

      • shalafi@lemmy.world
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        If you squint real hard, the first creation myth in Genisis is pretty close to evolution.

  • MagicShel@programming.dev
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    Religion is deliberately non-falsifiable. No matter what scientific proof you can come up with, at the end of the day they just say God is fucking with us burying skeletons of creatures that never existed and such.

    The fact that it needs to be constructed that way is frankly all the proof I need to toss religion in the garbage, but everyone isn’t so cavalier about the disposition of their “immortal soul.”

    Honestly immortality and the very nature of God are both abhorrent to me. If religion were true, the best I could hope for is to be cast into a lake of fire and be destroyed, so I kinda win either way. Worst case is all religion is wrong but so is atheism and I have to spend eternity with an entity who is less of a malicious cunt than the Abrahamic god.

    • m0darn@lemmy.ca
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      Religion is deliberately non-falsifiable.

      I think it would be more accurate to say that the non-falsifiablity of religion has evolved as a result of a sort of natural selection. Essentially all the falsifiable religious beliefs have been falsified, and thus have trouble propagating.

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    Translative spoken word by the time a second hand account of the word of god becomes the word of the person speaking. Weird god never came back once we had verbatim recording techniques to address these inaccuracies.

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    6 days ago

    Letter from Charles Darwin to Asa Gray (22nd May 1860)

    With respect to the theological view of the question; this is always painful to me.— I am bewildered.— I had no intention to write atheistically. But I own that I cannot see, as plainly as others do, & as I shd wish to do, evidence of design & beneficence on all sides of us. There seems to me too much misery in the world. I cannot persuade myself that a beneficent & omnipotent God would have designedly created the Ichneumonidæ with the express intention of their feeding within the living bodies of caterpillars, or that a cat should play with mice.

    Source

    • M68040 [they/them]@hexbear.net
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      6 days ago

      On that note, what’s up with the obligate coprophagy of the koala? And their famously smooth brains? I’d make the koala, were it I in the high seat, but a kind and caring creator wouldn’t.

      • TerminalEncounter [she/her]@hexbear.net
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        5 days ago

        Some herbivores can’t digest their food all the way, cows get around it by having more than one stomach and also chewing their cud (vomiting up from first stomach and rechewing). Rabbits do the same thing as koalas, partially digest their food and eat their poop.

  • D61 [any]@hexbear.net
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    5 days ago

    God’s an unfalsifiable claim, so there really isn’t anything that could test that hypothesis.

    Pretty much any scientific test/discovery that counters anything in a religious text whose adherents view the text as completely truthful and literal. But sciencey stuff might not have much of an effect on religious folks who view their texts less literally.

    But anyways… heliocentrism, germ theory, gravity, evolution through natural selection, probably a huge chunk of the field of archeology, plate tectonics, radiometric dating, probably the written language at various points in human history (but that’s not really a discovery), trans species organ transplants, decoding DNA, direct genetic engineering, CRISPR, radio telescopy.

  • jet@hackertalks.com
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    5 days ago

    Printing presses, industrialized education, and the industrial revolution.

    Giving people en mass the time study and educate themselves.

  • Delusional@lemmy.world
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    4 days ago

    Do we really need a scientific discovery to prove an existence that doesn’t exist? I think the proof that’s required is proof that God does exist and until that comes about, religion is clearly just a man made construct for the purpose of power and control.

    Besides, I’ve given clear scientific examples to religious people before and they simply stated that it exists that way because god created it that way which is just the dumbest fucking thinking imaginable. You can’t help those people.

  • Hazzia@discuss.tchncs.de
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    6 days ago

    Okay because Lemmy’s being Lemmy and poking holes at your question instead of even trying to provide a straight answer, I’m gonna assume you mean the Abrahamic god and say helocentrism and evolution were both ideas that the catholic church strongly opposed initially. Pretty much anything that says humans aren’t super special, actually, tends to not mesh with christian ideology, for obvious reasons. Modern day panpsychist ideas (the thought that consciousness is a fundamental property that becomes more complex with the complexity of the organism, or at the very least that plants and individual cells are conscious) are gaining hold in scientific communities lately and, if sufficiently proven/argued for (because consciousness is notoriously insufficiently defined), it’s probably gonna be another X on the accepted christian worldview.

    • ananas@sopuli.xyz
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      6 days ago

      There have been plenty of discoveries opposed by religion X. Those historically do not have significant impact on prevalence of such a religion.

      I do think answers explaining why any answer to the original question suffers from logical fallacies are equally good to those that do try to get to the OP’s intent, and I think it is good to have both. I do think the literal answers are more “straight” (and I tend to go to the literate mode when talking about science), so that’s what I went up with.